Go, Dog. Go! Children’s Theatre

My four year old is a book lover. Reading is a huge part of our home life.
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Before I became “Mom,” I was a fourth grade teacher.  I love books.  Before he was born, I started collecting children’s literature like I was opening a small school.  I wanted to be ready.  I was reading to him at a very young age and since I can remember, he has found great joy in reading stories.  I love to read to him and as is evident by our bookshelves, our collection is always growing.

When I saw that Go, Dog. Go!, by P.D. Eastman, was being done at the Seattle Children’s Theatre, I knew I had to get tickets.  This would be my son’s first experience with live theater and since the recommended age was four and up, I figured this would be a great way to introduce him to the stage.  Go, Dog. Go! is a book that we have read countless times and I was curious to see how it would translate to the stage.

We arrived a little early and he was eager for the show to begin.  Patience isn’t something many children excel at.  He was actually a little uneasy, not knowing what to expect.  Once the actors got started, though, he was intrigued, to say the least.  With one “dog” playing the keyboard, which provided a great flow to the production, and the rest bringing the story to life, this was truly a colorful and magical experience for my son.

With fun special effects (dogs with nightlights in bed, a roller skate that comes on stage by itself) and plenty of songs throughout the show, it kept my little boy interested.  By far, his favorite part was when the dogs play ball.  This turns into a rousing game of baseball where the dogs come into the audience and a huge inflatable “baseball” is hit to those watching the show.  My little guy couldn’t wait to see if it would come to him, and even though it didn’t, it hardly mattered.

Connecting literature with theater is a great way to help your kids see a story from a different perspective.  It was fun to reference the book as the show progressed.  During intermission, we talked about what parts of the book hadn’t happened yet.  We speculated how different scenes would be depicted and I could see the wheels in my little boy’s head spinning.  This show has brought new life to a classic storybook in our home.  I know next time we read Go, Dog. Go!, my son will see it through a much different lens.

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