Top Five Tips for Debate Watchers

Think Ahead-Before the debate, ask yourself which issues are most important to you, and jot down what you’d like to learn from each of the candidates.
Author:
Publish date:
  1. Think Ahead-Before the debate, ask yourself which issues are most important to you, and jot down what you’d like to learn from each of the candidates.
  2. Are They Answering the Question? Pay attention to how the candidates answer the questions.Are they specific? Sincere? Knowledgeable?
  3. Keep Track of Topics-Are the candidates being asked about your priority issues? Are the questions fair and pertinent?
  4. Talk it out! –Afterwards, talk about the debate with your friends & family. Did the debate sway your decision? Did you learn something new about the candidates’ positions?
  5. VOTE on November 4th.It is your best opportunity to make your voice heard and help shape the issues that affect all of us! VISIT VOTE411.org to prepare yourself.

**Find much more on our “Debates 101” page; including fun tips for hosting debate-watching parties, all at www.LWV.org**

“Debates are the final chance for candidates to rise above the clamor of attack ads, endless punditry and analysis, and engage in thoughtful debate about the competing challenges of reforming our education, healthcare, and environmental protection systems, strengthening our economy, and determining our place in the world,” Wilson concluded. “They are also the best opportunity for voters to see, first-hand, how each candidate responds to the tough issues facing the next tenant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.”

Comment

Related

Debate Watching 101

Debates can emphasize form over substance, such as the candidates’ appearance instead of their stands on the issues. You may watch a debate and still not get answers to the questions you have about the candidates and issues.

YouTube Debates

You've heard all about the CNN-YouTube debates among the Democratic presidential candidates. Now watch them yourself.

Q&A With Mary Hunt

Mary Hunt spent 30 years in the marketing industry selling “junk” to women. She is the author of In Women We Trust, a marketing-to-women handbook. Now Mary spends her time selling the importance of a sustainable earth to the female audience. Her goal is to help women think global yet act local. This month, Mary answers questions from TodaysMama.

MamaVote Talks to Cokie Roberts

She’s an award winning reporter and news analyst and one of the most recognized faces in television news, but Cokie Roberts will tell you that none of it was ever her plan.

Two Sides: Electing the President

We have always elected the president of the United States through the Electoral College. This month’s debate is whether we should switch to electing our presidents through a national popular vote.

2008 Elections

Who’s got your vote in the 2008 elections? Don’t know, don’t care, or don’t understand? Are you voting more on issues or on the individual? Why does the state of Iowa, no less, mean so much to the candidates? Do you know the difference between a “caucus” and a “primary”?

Nuts and Bolts

A couple of days ago I listened to a speech given to the UN by a 13 year old from Canada. It was very compelling, although clearly coached (which always makes me furrow my brow a little). But I’ve come away from listening to her brief speech compelled by two things that I think could apply to this early stage of the 2008 Presidential election.