When Was the Last Time You Pooped? Here’s Why It Matters.

This post is sponsored by Synergy Pharmaceuticals. The opinions and text are all mine.
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Was it today?

Was it two days ago?

Was it three days ago?

Here’s why it matters.

Poop is 75% water and the remaining 25% is an unsavory mixture of dead bacteria that helped us to digest our food, living bacteria, protein, indigestible fiber, and waste materials from the liver and intestines. (*1)

If you don’t, or aren’t able to GO, the water in your poop is reabsorbed into your body. Which causes the poop to harden and become even more difficult to pass. (*2)

So that’s a fantastic cycle of constipation that you’ve got going there.

Now, the WHOLE reason that pooping on a regular basis is so great/important/helpful, is that the mixture of waste goes from being a normal part of a healthy digestive system to a troublesome problem child in just a day or two.

When the digestive system is running smoothly—with inputs and outputs happening according to regularly scheduled programing—you’re GOOD. But it’s called “waste” for a reason!

Waste: having served or fulfilled a purpose; no longer of use.

Think of it like this, when traffic is backed up and nothing moves—there is no way around it—you’re stuck.

It may make you late for appointments or activities, may affect your emotional state, and has a “cascade” effect on other aspects of your day.

Your bowel is like a traffic jam…. you can’t poop—it’s not only frustrating to be stuck in one place, it has a cascade effect—you miss a meeting, you miss a child’s school event and more.

So, if you aren’t pooping regularly… how do you feel?

Do you feel like you can go full speed at that Zumba class?!

Like you can button up your favorite pair of jeans?

Like it’s no big deal to have a toddler climb up onto your lap to be read to?

Nope.

Did you know that if constipation is more than just an occasional occurrence you might have a condition called CIC — chronic idiopathic constipation?

Let’s see if this sounds familiar: (*3)

-Fewer than 3 bowel movements a week.

-Difficult-to-pass bowel movements.

-Straining.

-Discomfort.

-Not feeling empty after going.

Have you experienced this and racked your brain… rolling through what you ate (or didn’t eat), what you’ve been doing, how much water you’ve been drinking… only to be frustrated by your inability to pinpoint the problem?

Sure—travel and stress (and your menstrual cycle) can all do a number on your poop schedule, but if you’re having regular trouble pooping, you might be dealing with CIC.

Never heard of it?

You will. It’s one of the most common functional digestive disorders and affects 33 million Americans. (*4)

Now, before you scamper off to search for some off-the-wall solution to this via Pinterest, there is a prescription medicine that can help adults suffering from CIC, that you should talk to your doctor about. It’s called Trulance™ (plecanatide). (*5) Trulance is a once-daily tablet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration indicated to treat adults with CIC.5 Diarrhea is the most common side effect and can sometimes be severe.5 It is important to discuss the potential benefits and side effects with your doctor.5 You can learn more about CIC and how Trulance works here. See additional important safety information below.

So back to our earlier question… when was the last time you pooped? Maybe it is time to talk to your doctor about Trulance.

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What is Trulance?

Trulance™ (plecanatide) 3 mg tablets is a prescription medicine used in adults to treat a type of constipation called chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). “Idiopathic” means the cause of the constipation is unknown. It is not known if Trulance is safe and effective in children less than 18 years of age.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not give Trulance to children who are less than 6 years of age. It may harm them.

You should not give Trulance to children 6 years to less than 18 years of age. It may harm them.

Do not take Trulance if a doctor has told you that you have a bowel blockage (intestinal obstruction).

Before you take Trulance, tell your doctor:

If you have any other medical conditions.

If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Trulance will harm your unborn baby.

If you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Trulance passes into your breast milk. Talk with your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if you take Trulance.

About all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Side Effects

Diarrhea is the most common side effect and can sometimes be severe. Diarrhea often begins within the first 4 weeks of Trulance treatment. Stop taking Trulance and call your doctor right away if you get severe diarrhea.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Trulance. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

You are encouraged to report side effects to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088 or you can report side effects to Synergy Pharmaceuticals at 1-888-869-8869.

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