Pregnant with Twins– When to Stop Running

Pregnant with Twins– When to Stop Running
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I call myself a runner… rather, I called myself a runner, until I became doubly pregnant and put on 30 pounds (and I’ve still got 3 months to go!).  But I wanted to separate myself from those who are joggers.  I am not a jogger.  I am not a marathoner or a tri-athelete, either.  But I used to run competitively in high school and college, and I know how to train.  What I’m training for now is a massive, continual marathon in and of itself– carrying twins to term (or as close as possible) giving birth naturally (or as close as possible) and losing the expected 50 pounds quickly in order to go back to work– which, as a professional bellydancer, means baring my abdomen and moving my hips quickly.

Am I up for the challenge?  Not right now.  I’m exhausted.  But I think getting enough (or close to enough) sleep is part of the training, too.

A month ago, I was still doing a combination run/walk and covering about a mile and a half, two to three times a week.  I also did this pushing my 40 pound preschooler in the jogging, ahem– running— stroller.  When I made it out on my own, I ran the mile and a half.

And then one day, it happened.   I picked up the pace of my walk, started to run and…  my knees felt like they were going to break and my hips screamed, ‘Please, for the love, NO MORE!’  I listened, grudgingly, and stopped.

We’re down to walking now, and I only feel vaguely defeated.  I think that may have been the same night I got up, unable to sleep, and wrote out a list of all the ways I planned to whip my body into shape exactly 6 weeks after giving birth.  Many of them include the double runningstroller.

I know women (mostly I’ve just heard of them, so it could be an urban myth) who strap in their tummies and run all the way until they go into labor.  My hat is off to them– Bravo!  But that’s not me.  I’ll be content with my 2 mile walk, my yoga sessions, and lots of stretching and call myself close-enough-to-fit.

After all, sleeping is a big part of the training, too, and I intend to enjoy it while it lasts– which isn’t much longer.

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